Who Made My Clothes?

It has been five years since the factory collapse at Rana Plaza in Bangladesh killed over 1,000 people.

This tragic accident raised awareness of the risks apparel workers take to make our clothes, but unfortunately it did not end the exploitation in these supply chains. Daily, apparel workers continue to face a barrage of tragedy and exploitation in the form of debilitating accidents, injuries, wages that keep families in poverty, and human rights abuses.

During Fashion Revolution Week, April 24-30, we join the call to expose abuses and exploitation and create empowering, dignified work for apparel workers.

A simple step you can take is demanding transparency in supply chains. When we demand transparency, we put brands on notice and we can start to identify where improvements are needed.

You can contact your favorite apparel brand this week by phone, email, or social media and ask who made your clothes. We’ve also set up this tool to make it easier to Tweet at some of the most popular brands in the U.S.: H&M, Nike, Zara, and Old Navy.

Take Action with Twitter: Tell Nike, ZARA, H&M and Old Navy that you want clothes that don’t exploit workers!

Please copy the text below or make up your own…

tweet: I want clothes that don’t exploit workers. @Nike #whomademyclothes tweet: I want clothes that don’t exploit workers. @ZARA #whomademyclothes
tweet: I want clothes that don’t exploit workers. @OldNavy #whomademyclothes tweet: I want clothes that don’t exploit workers. @hm #whomademyclothes

Share on Facebook

 

5 thoughts on “Who Made My Clothes?

  1. organic cotton and rayon well in clothes only. Enough of Hesse unhealthy synthetics and sprayed materials with poisons on my skin.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share
Tweet
Pin
+1
0 Shares