Keeping Fair Trade Real
JOIN OUR MAILING LIST
Enter Email
CONTRIBUTE TODAY
FOLLOW US ON
FEATURED CAMPAIGN

 Watch the Video

Small-scale farmers grow 70% of the world’s food. Yet our global food system poses many obstacles to those who want to earn a fair livelihood. Watch the video “The Fair Trade Story” to see the connection between supporting dedicated fair trade brands and combating climate change and unjust trade policies.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EmailShare

TAKE ACTION

Tell Your Governor to be a Fair Trade Leader!

Individuals can feel good about purchasing food that is fair trade or supports a local farmer. However, when governments adopt fair institutional purchasing policies, the effects can be enormous. Institutional purchasing policies can prioritize purchases from vendors who meet certain criteria, such as paying living wages, providing healthy food, or buying from small to mid-sized farmers, rather than prioritizing, as is often the case, the least expensive options, driving prices, wages, quality, and nutrition standards down.

TAKE ACTION

Tell the International Cocoa Initiative (ICI) to Address Fair Pricing

The major cocoa industry group ICI claims to address child labor, but does not include fair and transparent pricing as part of its strategy. Send them a letter asking them to put farmers and child workers first. For more background and links to the reports, refer to our blog.

Fair World Project was initially launched by the Organic Consumers Association (OCA) in 2010 with an emphasis on promoting fair trade in commerce, especially in organic production systems, and protecting the term “fair trade” from dilution and misuse for mere PR purposes, as conscious consumers expand the market for fairly traded products.

To that end, FWP seeks to help consumers understand fair trade labels and market claims.

See our certifier analysis section to compare different aspects of fair trade and eco-social labels.

We also engage directly with certifiers and brands when see false or misleading claims in the marketplace or see that a certifier’s own policies are not upheld.

See for example, this letter we sent Fair for Life after Castle Rock bottled water issued a press release implying their water was fair trade certified. As a result, Fair for Life asked Castle Rock to clarify their messaging to make it clear the brand for For Life certified (a kind of corporate responsibility certification) but that the water itself is not fair trade.

If you see a fair trade market claim that does not seem right to you, email as at fairwash@fairworldproject.org.

Important Resources